TDV Consulting GmbH
 Dorian Janjic & Partner - Graz, Austria
 

Udevalla Bridge Sweden

The Sunningesund bridge, today named the Uddevalla bridge from the town Uddevalla located on the Swedish west coast, is part of the motorway E6 between Gothenburg and Oslo. Construction of the bridge started in mid 1997 and was completed during summer 2000.


Uddevalla Bridge, Cable stayed Bridge

The Uddevalla Bridge consists of three parts, the south approach bridge, the cable-stayed main bridge crossing the navigation channel to Uddevalla and the north approach bridge. The total length is 1712 m and the main span is 414 m long.

Structural analysis and TDVís involvement

The detailed design (according to Swedish design code) was carried out for the contractor Skanska by Skanska Teknik AB, a subsidiary of Skanska AB and Johs Holt A.S. in Norway. TDV in cooperation with its Norwegian representative TDA was in charge of the computer based structural analysis. All calculations have been performed in close cooperation with the engineers of Johs Holt A.S in order to guarantee full consistency between structural design and structural analysis.


Uddevalla Bridge Construction

A step by step analysis including all structural systems during the various erection stages until completion of the bridge has been performed. Time dependent strain from creep and shrinkage was included, also amplification of bending moments due to second order effects. Non-linear influences from cable sag have been considered.


  • Contract:
    • Uddevalla (Sunningesund) Bridge, Sweden
  • Owner:
    • Swedish National Road Administration
  • Consultant:
    • Johs Holt A.S., Norway
  • State of Construction:
    • Completed in 2000
  • TDV Involvement:
    • General advice on erection procedure by the cantilever method and construction stage analysis
    • Step by step analysis including all structural systems during the various erection stages until completion of the bridge has been performed. Including:
      • Time dependent strain from creep and shrinkage;
      • Amplification of bending moments due to second order effects;
      • Nonlinear influences from cable sagging.